MBA Programs

1.Babson College (Olin)

Business School Overview

The F.W. Olin Graduate School of Business at Babson College offers these departments and concentrations: accounting, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, general management, marketing, management information systems, production/operations management, organizational behavior, quantitative analysis/statistics and operations research, and technology. Its tuition is full-time: $105,118 total program and part-time: $1,660 per credit. At graduation, 53.7 percent of graduates of the full-time program are employed.

The F.W. Olin Graduate School of Business at Babson College places a strong emphasis on entrepreneurialism and the global marketplace, which is reflected in the school’s learning goals of ethics, integration, teamwork, and entrepreneurial and innovative thinking. Graduate business students can work toward these goals via one of the school’s four M.B.A. programs. Two full-time programs take place on the school’s campus in Babson Park, Mass., about 30 minutes from Boston. Part-time students with substantial professional experience can opt for the 21-month fast track program offered in either Babson Park or San Francisco, while students needing more flexibility in the schedule can choose the self-paced evening M.B.A. program.

Babson M.B.A. students gain real-world experience through the Babson Consulting Alliance program, a requirement for all two-year students, and hone their international business skills through the school’s Global Management program. Babson College also partners with universities, nonprofits, and governments across the world to promote global entrepreneurship.

Outside of academics, students at the Olin Graduate School of Business build camaraderie through volunteer events and 1980s-themed ski trips. The school’s proximity to Boston means students can easily tour the city’s historic areas or see one of the city’s storied sports teams in action—Boston is home to the Red Sox, Celtics, Bruins, and Patriots— in their downtime. Notable Olin alumni include Stephen Spinelli Jr., cofounder of Jiffy Lube International; and Mir Ibrahim Rahman, cofounder and CEO of GEO TV Network, a prominent media organization in Pakistan.

 

2.Stanford University

Business School Overview

The Graduate School of Business at Stanford University offers these departments and concentrations: accounting, e-commerce, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, general management, human resources management, leadership, manufacturing and technology management, marketing, not-for-profit management, production/operations management, organizational behavior, portfolio management, public administration, public policy, real estate, sports business, supply chain management/logistics, quantitative analysis/statistics and operations research, and technology. Its tuition is full-time: $66,540 per year. At graduation, 62.8 percent of graduates of the full-time program are employed.

Leadership is one focus of graduate business programs on Stanford’s sunny campus. Students grapple with simulations of tough management cases, like having to lay off employees. Each simulation is filmed, too, so students can critique themselves and learn from each other. The GSB also hosts the The View From the Top speaker series, which brings in leaders of major corporations across the country to speak to students about effective management.

Students at GSB can earn an MBA, or a Ph.D. in seven areas. Seasoned managers can enroll in the MSx Program and will earn a Master of Science degree in management in 12 months. There are no part-time, online or evening degree options offered. MBA students can opt for joint or dual degree programs through Stanford’s Law SchoolSchool of EngineeringSchool of MedicineSchool of Education, School of Humanities and Sciences, and School of Earth Sciences. For students who want to explore a subject without committing to a degree, there are more than 30 cross-school elective courses to choose from. There are also specialty programs, like the summer Stanford Ignite certificate program, open to graduate non-business students.

When not studying, students can get involved in more than 70 organizations, which range from the studious Finance and Investment Club to the relaxed Wine Circle. There are also ongoing campus initiatives like the Center for Social Innovation and the Center for Leadership Development and Research.

The business school is located on the eastern end of the Stanford campus, and GSB students may live nearby in university housing. Most on-campus residents are first year MBA students who all live in the same housing complex. To get around campus and downtown Palo Alto, Calif., students can hop on the school’s free bus, called the Marguerite Shuttle. Notable alumni of the school include Richard Kovacevich, former chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo & Co.; John Donahoe, president and CEO of eBay; and Ellen Siminoff, founding executive of Yahoo!

3.Harvard University

Business School Overview

The Business School at Harvard University offers these departments and concentrations: accounting, consulting, e-commerce, economics, entrepreneurship, ethics, finance, general management, health care administration, human resources management, international business, leadership, manufacturing and technology management, marketing, not-for-profit management, production/operations management, organizational behavior, portfolio management, public administration, public policy, real estate, sports business, supply chain management/logistics, quantitative analysis/statistics and operations research, tax, and technology. Its tuition is full-time: $63,675 per year. At graduation, 79.3 percent of graduates of the full-time program are employed.

Graduate students at Harvard Business School get a hands-on education through the case method, which poses true-to-life problems students must tackle in teams. The experiential learning extends to field study teams, in which small groups of students evaluate existing organizations, and immersion trips, intense weeks of study in another country over winter breaks.

HBS students can complete an MBA or doctoral degree, or can take executive education classes. (HBS graduates can take many executive education courses at a 30 percent discount.) HBS students can also enroll in joint degree programs in conjunction with Harvard Law SchoolHarvard Medical School, the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Graduate business school students may live on campus in Cambridge, Mass. Students can also research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

To supplement their education, students can assume leadership positions in more than 70 clubs. The annual HBS Show, a live musical theatre production put on by MBA students, adds some levity into the rigorous course schedule.

There are more than 100,000 graduates of HBS, scores of whom have gone on to lead major corporations. Some of the particularly notable alumni include James Dimon, president and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co.; Meg Whitman, president and CEO of Hewlett-Packard; and Jeffrey Immelt, chairman and CEO of General Electric.

 

4.Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan)

Business School Overview

The Sloan School of Management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology offers these departments and concentrations: accounting, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, general management, health care administration, human resources management, industrial management, international business, leadership, manufacturing and technology management, marketing, management information systems, production/operations management, organizational behavior, supply chain management/logistics, quantitative analysis/statistics and operations research, tax, and technology. Its tuition is full-time: $67,938 per year. At graduation, 81.2 percent of graduates of the full-time program are employed.

Though graduate students at the Sloan School of Management study at the campus facilities in Cambridge, Mass., their business education has a broader slant. The academic courses are inherently global in nature, and there are dozens of opportunities for students to travel and study abroad. The school also has Action Labs for students to tackle real problems in existing companies in the United States, China and India.

Even graduate student organizations at MIT have a global focus, with business clubs for nations around the world. There are also sports clubs for everything from skiing and snowboarding to golfing, and student athletes can join MBA intramural teams to compete with other MBA students throughout the Northeast and across the nation. Students can also compete in yearlong contests in the MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition, with cash prizes for winning business plans. Students, faculty and staff meet weekly for Consumption Functions, better known as “C-Functions,” which often celebrate international cultures with food, music and dancing.

The business school campus is near a stop on the “T” subway system, and downtown Boston is about a 20-minute walk away. Students may live in university housing, though space is limited.

Close to a quarter of Sloan graduates have gone on to become company presidents and CEOs, and some of the most notable alumni include Carly Fiorina, former president and CEO of Hewlett-Packard Co.; John Reed, former chairman of Citicorp; and Benjamin Netanyahu, prime minister of Israel.

 

5.University of California–Berkeley (Haas)

Business School Overview

The Haas School of Business at University of California–Berkeley offers these departments and concentrations: accounting, consulting, e-commerce, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, general management, health care administration, human resources management, international business, leadership, manufacturing and technology management, marketing, management information systems, not-for-profit management, production/operations management, organizational behavior, portfolio management, public administration, public policy, real estate, supply chain management/logistics, quantitative analysis/statistics and operations research, and technology. Its tuition is full-time: $56,009 per year (in-state); full-time: $57,560 per year (out-of-state); part-time: $3,169 per credit (in-state); part-time: $3,169 per credit (out-of-state); executive: $174,000 total program (in-state); and executive: $174,000 total program (out-of-state). At graduation, 68.6 percent of graduates of the full-time program are employed.

Graduate students at the Haas School of Business benefit from the school’s location near San Francisco, a hotbed of major businesses like Google and Visa. It’s a convenient place to find internships and jobs to supplement a business education. Through the Haas@Work program, students are assigned to projects at both local and global companies. Students earn an MBA in 21 months in the traditional program, or in three years if they attend part time in the evenings and on Saturdays. Electives make up more than half the MBA curriculum, and students can select courses offered at Haas or at other academic divisions of UC-Berkeley. Seasoned business professionals can earn their MBA in 19 months via the Berkeley MBA for Executives program.

Close to a third of MBA students at UC-Berkeley are international, and many business courses have a global focus. There are a few research centers on campus, including the Asia Business Center and the Fisher Center for Real Estate and Urban Economics. Notable alumni include John Riccitiello, former CEO of Electronic Arts; Cathie Lesjak, executive vice president and CFO of Hewlett-Packard; and Walter Haas, a former president of Levi Strauss & Co. and the namesake of the business school.

 

6.University of Michigan–Ann Arbor (Ross)

Business School Overview

The Stephen M. Ross School of Business at University of Michigan–Ann Arbor offers these departments and concentrations: accounting, consulting, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, general management, health care administration, human resources management, international business, leadership, manufacturing and technology management, marketing, production/operations management, organizational behavior, portfolio management, real estate, supply chain management/logistics, quantitative analysis/statistics and operations research, and technology. Its tuition is full-time: $59,350 per year (in-state); full-time: $64,350 per year (out-of-state); part-time: $1,958 per credit (in-state); part-time: $2,125 per credit (out-of-state); executive: $60,050 per year (in-state); and executive: $62,050 per year (out-of-state). At graduation, 85.6 percent of graduates of the full-time program are employed.

The University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business stresses action-based learning, a concept designed to teach students to ask pertinent questions, identify important problems and become effective leaders. Students can complete a full-time, part-time, global or executive MBA. Part-time degrees can be completed in the evenings or on weekends, and the EMBA courses meet only one weekend a month. There are also master’s degree programs in accounting, management, entrepreneurship and supply chain management, as well as a Ph.D. program.

Students can get involved in a handful of centers and institutes at the business school, including the Frederick A. and Barbara M. Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise and the Tauber Institute for Global Operations. There are more than 70 student-run clubs and organizations, as well as a women’s initiative that offers support and programming for female students at the Ross School of Business. Students can find housing on and off campus in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Notable alumni of the Ross School of Business include Stacey Stewart, U.S. president of United Way Worldwide, and Roger Frock, former general manager of FedEx.

 

7.University of Pennsylvania (Wharton)

Business School Overview

The Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania offers these departments and concentrations: accounting, actuarial science, e-commerce, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, general management, health care administration, human resources management, insurance, international business, marketing, production/operations management, public policy, real estate, and quantitative analysis/statistics and operations research. Its tuition is full-time: $67,516 per year and executive: $192,900 total program. At graduation, 85.8 percent of graduates of the full-time program are employed.

The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania was the U.S.’s first business school and now has the largest alumni network in the country.

In addition to graduate business degrees, students can pursue joint degrees, including an accelerated MBA/J.D. degree in three years in conjunction with the Penn Law School; an MBA/M.A. degree in International Studies; and joint degree programs through the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Students can also earn a Ph.D. at Wharton, typically in four to five years, in nine areas including ethics & legal studies, statistics and applied economics.

Students learn how to handle stress, make critical decisions and lead a team outside the classroom on outdoor trips called Ventures. Whether students are mountaineering on Africa’s Mount Kilimanjaro, trekking through Antarctica or sailing in Grenada, they put their leadership skills to the test during the weeklong trips. For leadership training closer to home, students can get hands-on experience in about 25 research centers on campus and have close to 150 organizations to get involved in.

The school has campuses in Philadelphia and San Francisco. Students at the Philadelphia campus can live in University City, an area also home to Drexel University and the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia.

There are close to 90,000 alumni worldwide, and some of the most notable graduates are John Sculley, former CEO of Apple Inc.; Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn; and J.D. Power III, founder of J.D. Power and Associates, a global marketing information firm.

 

8.Indiana University (Kelley)

Business School Overview

The Kelley School of Business at Indiana University offers these departments and concentrations: accounting, consulting, entrepreneurship, finance, general management, marketing, production/operations management, and supply chain management/logistics. Its tuition is full-time: $25,500 per year (in-state); full-time: $44,460 per year (out-of-state); part-time: $772 per credit (in-state); and part-time: $1,457 per credit (out-of-state). At graduation, 83.9 percent of graduates of the full-time program are employed.

Integration is the focus of business programs at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business. The goal during the first semester of the full-time M.B.A. program is to weave together every business discipline to broaden the students’ perspectives on business. Leadership is a theme that is prevalent within the school, and this theme is implemented during the first semester when students are placed into teams of four and must work together to complete projects. The Kelley Leadership Speakers Series brings influential leaders and business executives to campus to discuss a myriad of topics with students.

Along with the full-time M.B.A., students can also pursue an online M.B.A. or a Ph.D. or can complete a specialized master’s degree in information systems or accounting. Joint degrees are offered in conjunction with the Maurer School of Law, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Department of Telecommunications.

Students of the Kelley School of Business gain much of their career guidance through experiential learning, such as Bloomington Brands, which immerses the students in real-world business problems in the classroom to prepare for life outside of the school. Through Kelley Academies, students partner with a professor who is an expert in their career area and can guide them through post-graduate decisions. There are also roughly 18 clubs and 20 committees for Kelley students to participate in on campus.

Alumni of the Kelley School include John Chambers, president and CEO of Cisco Systems, Inc.; Harold Arthur Poling, former president and CEO of Ford Motor Co.; and Jimmy Wales, cofounder of Wikipedia.

 

9.University of Texas–Austin (McCombs)

Business School Overview

The McCombs School of Business at University of Texas–Austin offers these departments and concentrations: accounting, consulting, entrepreneurship, finance, general management, international business, marketing, management information systems, not-for-profit management, production/operations management, portfolio management, public policy, real estate, and supply chain management/logistics. Its tuition is full-time: $34,296 per year (in-state); full-time: $50,296 per year (out-of-state); part-time: $107,245 total program (in-state); and executive: $113,410 total program (in-state). At graduation, 77.5 percent of graduates of the full-time program are employed.

MBA students at the University of Texas—Austin McCombs School of Business have opportunities to get hands-on experience throughout their education. The school runs unique programs including Venture Fellows, an internship program that places students in venture capital and private equity firms, and the Texas MBA+ Leadership Program, which trains student leaders through workshop, micro-consulting projects and more.

The school offers a full-time MBA, evening MBA and executive MBA programs. There are also weekend MBA programs offered at the Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston campuses, as well as an executive MBA program in Mexico City. Students can also earn a Ph.D., Master of Science in Technology Commercialization, a Master of Public Accounting (M.P.A.), a Master of Science in Finance, and a Master of Science in Information Risk and Operations Management. MBA students can cater the education to their interests with about 20 areas of concentration, though choosing a concentration is not required. Students can also complete dual degree programs, including an MBA/J.D. and additional master’s degrees in areas like Asian studies, communication, nursing and Middle Eastern studies.

The school offers study abroad options for students to earn a second MBA at institutions in places including Hong Kong, Beijing and Sao Paulo, Brazil. There are more than 30 organizations for graduate students to get involved in. The school has on-campus housing for both single and married students in Austin.

The McCombs alumni base is more than 84,000-strong (more than 17,000 of which are MBA graduates), and some of the most accomplished alums include James J. Mulva, former CEO of energy giant ConocoPhillips Co., and Red McCombs, namesake of the business school and co-founder of Clear Channel Communications, Inc. and McCombs Energy.

 

10.University of Southern California (Marshall)

Business School Overview

The Marshall School of Business at University of Southern California offers these departments and concentrations: accounting, consulting, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, general management, health care administration, human resources management, international business, leadership, marketing, management information systems, not-for-profit management, production/operations management, organizational behavior, portfolio management, real estate, sports business, supply chain management/logistics, quantitative analysis/statistics and operations research, tax, and technology. Its tuition is full-time: $55,474 per year; part-time: $1,778 per credit; and executive: $108,814 total program. At graduation, 75.2 percent of graduates of the full-time program are employed.

At the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business, students are involved in case discussions and competitions, presentations, and team projects. All full-time, first year M.B.A. students enroll in the Pacific Rim International Management Education program (known as PRIME), which examines the business environment and management styles in Pacific Rim and Latin American countries in class and during a 10-day trip abroad. Other degree programs at USC Marshall include an Executive M.B.A. offered in Los Angeles and Shanghai; Ph.D. programs; and master’s degrees in accounting, business taxation, and medical management.

The student body has slightly more than 200 students, about 35 percent of whom are female and about a quarter of whom are international students. There are more than 30 business school groups, which are managed by second year students and offer leadership roles for first year students, too. Students gather for events like weekly Thursday Night Mixers and M.B.A. football tailgate parties. Graduate students may live on campus, though university-owned housing spaces go fast and most students live off campus in private apartments.

Notable graduates of USC Marshall include Bradford Duea, president of digital music service Napster, LLC; Chris DeWolfe, cofounder of social networking website MySpace; and Stephen Goodall, CEO and president of global marketing information firm J.D. Power & Associates.

 

4 Times Pursuing an MBA Makes Sense

MBA

About MBA Admissions: Strictly Business

Stacy Blackman launched her MBA admissions consulting company in 2001 and has since helped thousands of clients gain admission to the most selective business schools in the world, many with merit scholarships. Blackman is the author of The MBA Application Roadmap: The Essential Guide to Getting Into a Top Business School, and has published a series of online guides which contain in depth guidance on the admissions process at top schools. Blackman has degrees from both The Wharton School and the Kellogg Graduate School of Management.

For many people, business school is the ideal platform to continue their professional and personal development and achieve their career goals. Take a look at these common motivating factors to determine whether you, too, should head back to the classroom for an MBA.

1. You want to switch careers. By some estimates, at least two-thirds of MBA applicants look to business school as a surefire way to launch their career in a new direction.

One past client, Sheila, worked as a real estate attorney focused on commercial transactions when she decided that she found working with the financial details of transactions more interesting than the legal intricacies. She passed the first level of the Certified Financial Analyst exam and had a great deal of financial knowledge, but a very limited understanding of other areas of business management.

Sheila had come to a point in her career where she knew what she wanted to work on for the rest of her professional life. Though the CFA program is a tremendous resource, she had enough experience to know that she needed to develop the skills best provided by earning an MBA. Going to business school became the next logical step toward her objective of working in real estate banking at a Wall Street firm.

2. Your target company demands it. If your sights are set on working for companies such as Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase & Co., McKinsey & Co. or Boston Consulting Group, know that having the MBA credential is typically an unspoken requirement. These top banking and consulting firms mandate MBA degrees for upper management positions.

While they hire employees with bachelor’s degrees for entry-level positions, the understanding is that associates will work for a few years and then head to business school to earn the degree that will open doors to senior management and partner positions.

Even if smaller firms don’t require the MBA outright, employees find they advance up the ladder much faster with the graduate management degree.

3. You hit a ceiling. When Constance first came to us, she had already spent six years working in consulting and banking, but in her current role her contributions were narrowly focused on one piece of the client’s puzzle. To broaden her role and shift to strategic consulting for financial institutions, Constance needed an MBA.

She knew her experience with strategy and working for banks would enable her to participate in the classroom, but MBA courses in financial accounting, financial engineering and risk management would expand her knowledge and give her the full toolkit for landing a position as an associate at a top-tier consulting firm in the U.S. or Europe.

Constance’s long-term goal involved eventually taking a partner role at a smaller, niche consulting firm. Business school was a crucial next step for transition.

4. You need new skills. Our former client Peter’s undergraduate degree was in art history from a small liberal arts college. While most of his classmates had pursued Ph.Ds for a career in academia, he had always wanted to find a way to combine his creative interests within a team-based environment.

Peter began his career in an entry-level position at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the arts education group. Within a few years he was on a strong trajectory within MoMA, but Peter really wanted to focus on entrepreneurial activity within the arts world. He decided he needed an MBA to gain the hard financial and management skills required to meet that goal.

As you can see, every individual’s needs and motivations are different. When you map out your medium- and long-term professional goals, think about what gaps you have and whether an MBA could be that transformational experience that changes your career trajectory forever.

If you’re applying to business school because you want to make a career change, you are not alone.

In a recent survey of MBA applicants, nearly half those applicants – 48 percent – said a desire for a new career was one of their primary reasons for pursuing an MBA, according to the Association of International Graduate Admissions Consultants.

MBA students often use business school to catapult into a job unlike any they’d had.

According to a 2017 study from the Graduate Management Admission Council, 52 percent of MBA alumni work in a different industry or job function than they did before business school, and two out of five work in an industry they hadn’t even considered before business school.

U.S. News asked MBA graduates who switched careers to explain how business school helped them transition to a new industry.

Discovering a Passion

Satish Selvanathan spent six years trading mortgage-backed debt in the investment banking industry during the years leading up to the Great Recession.

“In 2006, I saw the writing on the wall and knew very clearly that my industry would not be the same for much longer,” he said in an email. “At the same time, I felt I had lost touch with the reality of owning or operating a business. Mortgage-backed debt is a product created by statistical modeling; it is not something you can feel or touch or relate to.”

He applied to business school hoping that MBA would lead to a fulfilling career.

Selvanathan is now a private equity investor and a co-founder of Spotlight Capital, a turnaround investment firm.

He says Columbia Business School taught him how to analyze and improve companies. The MBA program helped him find his true calling: reviving troubled companies.

“Business school was very meaningful for me, because I fell in love with a topic, which subsequently became a beautiful career,” he says.

Tapping Into Creativity

When Shelly Sahi applied to the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, she was a business analyst at Ford Motor Company, and she was eager to learn more about business strategy so she could contribute to strategy discussions at her company.

But during her MBA program, Sahi realized the idea of starting a business excited her.

She decided to use her materials science background to build a cosmetics company. Her longstanding interest in the industry stemmed from the years she spent blending foundations and lipsticks designed for people with European ancestry to match her North Indian complexion.

“In the back of my mind, I always knew that I wanted to be in the fashion and luxury goods and beauty world, but this was my chance now to explore whether I could do this,” she says.

Sahi visited the Zell Lurie Institute at Ross to ask its professors and entrepreneurs-in-residence for advice. She says they encouraged her and provided her with vital guidance on how to execute her vision. Officials at the Zell Lurie Institute told Sahi about potential funding sources and connected her with alumni who are successful entrepreneurs, she says.

Sahi is now the CEO and founder of SAHI Cosmetics, which she says probably wouldn’t have happened without the support of her business school.

“It is tough to be a sole founder so if you can put yourself amongst other entrepreneurs and bounce ideas off of one another, it really helps you succeed,” she says.

A Moment of Self-Discovery

Marketing and brand consultant Jeff Magnuson says business school was a turning point.

“I didn’t think I would be a career switcher until I went to business school,” says Magnuson, a 2011 MBA graduate from the Kenan-Flagler Business School at University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill.

Before business school, Magnuson spent eight years working on Wall Street, including five years with Goldman Sachs Group, but decided to switch to marketing in his first year of business school.

His change of heart came after a trip where he and other students attended information sessions with Wall Street employers.

“It was all very positive, and everyone was very helpful, but I just knew in my heart that was it,” he says. “I didn’t want to go back. Eight years was enough.”

Magnuson had a friend with a marketing background and asked her to tell him everything she knew about marketing, and he liked what she said. So he went to his school’s career center and asked for advice on how to pursue a career in the field, and eventually signed up for multiple marketing courses.

Magnuson says business school provides a unique opportunity for career exploration. “It’s basically like coming to a point in the road where you can choose one of eight directions to go in,” he says.

Searching for a business school? Get our complete rankings of Best Business Schools

Source: https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-business-schools/entrepreneurship-rankings?int=aa6b09&int=acf809

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